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Why I Always Travel With a Medical Kit

Nomad Travel Health Services

Nomad Travel Clinics

Need help? Please book an appointment or call
0134 155 5061

Using the Nomad clinic services gives you a one-to-one experience with a qualified, highly trained, travel health nurse.

The consultation includes:

  • A detailed medical history
  • Risk assessment based on style and length of your trip
  • Advice on preventative measures you can take

Your pharmacy based travel clinic is all very well but for specialist advice at the same or lower cost come to Nomad. This is strongly advised if you are on a more adventurous or complex itinerary, or have special medical needs. Nomad Travel Clinics are specialists in:

  • Last minute travel
  • Complex itineraries
  • Travel health and existing medical conditions
  • Open 6 days per week

allowing 6-8 weeks for your vaccination programme, you have time to fit in full courses of vaccines where required which provides you with the best possible protection against certain vaccine preventable diseases. If you don’t have time to complete courses before you go, you risk travelling with little or even no protection against sometimes high risk diseases.

Nomad Pharmacy

Nomad Travel Pharmacy has a wide range of Pharmacy items for all your outdoor and travel needs. Browse the Nomad Pharmacy here...

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It was on an adventure in 2010 to South America that taught Nomad Manchester's Alys the value of having a comprehensive medical kit like the Overlander.

I cringed knowing that I had a cannula in my med kit, which was now miles away back in the hostel, and now had to trek around in a place where I had no idea where I was, didn't speak the language nor was any pharmacy going to be open.

Whilst on a night out in Cuzco, Peru, one of my travelling companions Andy had a nasty accident which caused both of his heel bones to be shattered. He was in agony and needed urgent medical attention but it was three hours post–accident of driving around in a cab before we found a hospital that would see us. On arrival they didn’t have any cannulas in stock to administer IV pain relief (which sit in the vein so drugs can be absorbed as quickly as possible) so we had to go and buy one before they could do anything about the excruciating pain. I cringed knowing that I had a cannula in my med kit, which was now miles away back in the hostel, and now had to trek around in a place where I had no idea where I was, didn't speak the language nor was any pharmacy going to be open. After an absolute nightmare trying to find one, I really wished I had not been so naive about accidents in a foreign country. Andy remained in Cuzco hospital for three months, couldn't walk for 6 months, got septicaemia, had three operations and it all cost £30,000.

Ever since I have always had my trusty Overlander nearby 'just in case'. If I had it on me at the time and not left it in the hostel, I would have been able to clean and dress his wounds temporarily, reducing the chance of infection, supply a cannula immediately and therefore not delay pain relief, and I would have been able to administer paracetamol to reduce the pain while we were looking for medical treatment. Hard lesson learned!