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If only ABC were as easy as 1-2-3!

Written by

Lucy Hedges


Nomad Travel Health Services

Nomad Travel Clinics

Need help? Please book an appointment or call
0134 155 5061

Using the Nomad clinic services gives you a one-to-one experience with a qualified, highly trained, travel health nurse.

The consultation includes:

  • A detailed medical history
  • Risk assessment based on style and length of your trip
  • Advice on preventative measures you can take

Your pharmacy based travel clinic is all very well but for specialist advice at the same or lower cost come to Nomad. This is strongly advised if you are on a more adventurous or complex itinerary, or have special medical needs. Nomad Travel Clinics are specialists in:

  • Last minute travel
  • Complex itineraries
  • Travel health and existing medical conditions
  • Open 6 days per week

allowing 6-8 weeks for your vaccination programme, you have time to fit in full courses of vaccines where required which provides you with the best possible protection against certain vaccine preventable diseases. If you don’t have time to complete courses before you go, you risk travelling with little or even no protection against sometimes high risk diseases.

Nomad Pharmacy

Nomad Travel Pharmacy has a wide range of Pharmacy items for all your outdoor and travel needs. Browse the Nomad Pharmacy here...

 

Tori Nixon, recounts her and a friend’s experiences climbing to Annapurna Base Camp.Tori was Lead Nurse at Nomad Russell Square clinic and now works at Raleigh International.

At 8,091 meters, ‘Annapurna One’ is the world’s tenth highest mountain, reserved for the professional only. Annapurna Base Camp (ABC) on the other hand, is a glorious vantage point at 4,130 meters and constitutes the trekker’s terminus.

Yet, above 2,500m the risk of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) are equally genuine for trekkers and professionals alike. ABC has a demanding schedule, as do many treks, such as Kilimanjaro. This factor particularly increases the risk of altitude sickness – you are gaining in altitude quickly with little time to let your body aclimatize.

Passing us on their way down was a woman being carried aloft by three sherpas, each taking their turn to piggy-back her using supporting Nepalese head straps, in order to bring her down in altitude quickly.

The trek takes you above 4,000m, an altitude above which you can begin to exhibit symptoms of the conditions High Altitude Cerebral Oedema or High Altitude Pulmonary Oedema. But what is one to do when the mountains are places where historic tales and endeavor become intertwined – not an opportunity to miss! With our tight schedule in mind, we decided the key to help prevent us being hampered by potential severe illness was to take the altitude medication Diamox as a preventative measure.

On Day 1, to the fore were outstanding views beckoning us up the valley. Maintaining our hydration and not feeling any strain or discomfort, we continued to increase in altitude. A brief stop for ginger tea in a Cornish mug made us feel a lot better!

On Day 2, we felt quite a time pressure as we were hiking on the cusp of monsoon season and as a result the Annapurna Trail was about to close. We set off with only the mildest aches from the previous day, however. Passing us on their way down was a woman being carried aloft by three sherpas, each taking their turn to piggy-back her using supporting Nepalese head straps, in order to bring her down in altitude quickly. She looked severely unwell, and on enquiring if she was OK, were told she had quite rapidly begun to show symptoms of altitude sickness; increasing tiredness, shortness of breath, dizziness, nausea and severe headache.

Descending not far behind her was a Nepalese guide with his party of young trekkers. He explained that half his group had got ‘Altitude Sickness’ and one girl had to be evacuated in the middle of the night! We pushed on, reassured of our decision to use Diamox.